There's plenty of things in life, that when you're asked, you just say "yes." When you're offered a second helping of dessert. Yes. When your wife asks "do I look good in this outfit?" Yes. When any situation brings up the question asking if you want bacon on that.....YES! But I'm not sure where your mind has to be that you would say yes when the little voice in your head asks, "should I walk over and get as close as I can to that mama grizzly bear and her cubs?"

It's not something you or I would probably do.....mostly for the fact that I'm guessing we both like our faces and would prefer they weren't ripped off by a territorial bear. But some lady at Yellowstone National Park decided to approach mama bear and her babies earlier this month. Looking at the picture that was posted to Facebook by YNP, the woman quickly thought better of her actions when the mother bear started to charge at her. Thankfully, the bear decided to return to her cubs instead of addressing the issue further with the mystery woman. Yikes - that situation could have had an ending that was much worse.

Rangers are asking for the public's help in trying to identify the woman in the picture. The incident happened around 4:45 p.m. on May 10. So if you have any info on the woman described as "white, mid 30’s, brown hair, heavyset, and wearing black clothing," you're asked to call or text 888-653-0009, go online at www.nps.gov/ISB, or send an email to nps_isb@nps.gov.

A KPAX article about the story also reminds anyone visiting Yellowstone that "visitors must stay 25 yards away from all large animals – bison, elk, bighorn sheep, deer, moose, and coyotes - and at least 100 yards away from bears and wolves."

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