Dr. Anthony Fauci will be the featured speaker in the University of Montana's 2021 Mansfield Lecture February 17. The presentation will be Wednesday, February 17, at 12 noon. The public will be able to view it online on the Zoom platform, according to Deena Mansour, executive director of the UM Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center. Dr. Fauci is director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the U.S. National Institutes of Health. He is one of the world’s most-cited biomedical scientists.

On February 17, Dr. Fauci and Dr. Robert Saldin, Director of the Mansfield Ethics and Public Affairs Program will have a conversation about COVID-19. There will be questions from the public and expected topics will include the current situation in the U.S. and throughout the world, and when will "normal" life return, and what will "normal" look like?

After the initial presentation, Dr. Marshall Bloom of Hamilton's Rocky Mountain Laboratories will talk about the role of that Montana NIAID lab in health research. Bloom is the Associate Director of Science Management at RML. He was recently inducted into the Montana BioScience Hall of Fame.

Dr. Fauci in 2002 was instrumental in construction of NIAID's first biosafety level-4 facility at the Hamilton campus, working with Dr. Bloom and visiting Montana several times. Registration for the February 17 online event is free at the Mansfield website.

In the three weeks preceding the Dr. Fauci event, the Mansfield Center presents three panel discussions, also on the ZOOM platform. You can register at the Mansfield website:
January 27 at 12 noon - Serving Montana: UM's Public Health COVID-19 Response.
February 3 at 12 noon - Disproportionate Impacts on Native American Communities.
February 10 at 12 noon - Rights and Responsibilities in a Time of COVID.

The Mansfield Lecture was founded in 1968 in honor of the late U.S. Senator Mike Mansfield. Through the years, speakers have included Milton Friedman, Daniel Ellsberg and Barbara Tuchman.

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